Arts

Movie Review: Bohemian Rhapsody

BY JONAH LAWSON

Overall Rating: ★★★☆☆

Warning: Minor spoilers… obviously

Nominated in six categories, including Best Picture, at Sunday’s Academy Awards, Bohemian Rhapsody is a biopic based on the life of Freddie Mercury, the late lead singer of best-selling rock band Queen. The song “Bohemian Rhapsody” received harsh reviews from critics but was adored by fans, and the same can be said for the movie (and consider me a fan).

Nearly everyone can agree on Rami Malek’s fantastic performance as Freddie Mercury, which blended flamboyant moments on stage with heart-rending scenes from Mercury’s personal life. While I wouldn’t necessarily say this movie should win Best Picture, Malek’s rendition of a unique, famously private man is a major contender for Best Actor, and deservedly so. Another positive for the film was its inclusion of Freddie Mercury’s sexuality. The film devoted many scenes to his struggles with coming out and his drug usage, a problem faced by the LGBTQ  community during this period as they struggled with discrimination and abuse. Some critics hold that the film doesn’t cover his sexuality in enough depth, but in the end the film wasn’t intended to focus solely on his sexuality, and it focused on it sufficiently. To be honest, when I saw the trailer, I and many others believed they wouldn’t mention his sexuality at all.

Bohemian Rhapsody has been called the highest grossing LGBTQ film in history, and with that title comes certain responsibilities, which brings me to my major issue with the film: it assumes that Freddie Mercury is gay when he may have been bisexual. He never confirmed his sexuality, but he did maintain long-term relationships with both men and women. This bisexual erasure is very harmful, especially coming from an LGBTQ film, because it perpetuates the stereotype that bisexuals are simply confused and that people can only be either gay or straight. Another issue the film faces is its moments of historical inaccuracy, particularly in the scenes immediately preceding the Live Aid concert. In reality, the band had not broken up at this point, and while Mercury had gone solo, it was not due to animosity within the band (as the movie depicts); in fact, during his solo career Mercury stayed in touch with his bandmates. The film also features Mercury revealing his AIDS diagnosis to his band before the Live Aid concert. This unnecessarily dramatic monologue technically shouldn’t occur until two years after the Live Aid performance. In these two instances, the film decides to discard truth in favor of dramatization, and this dismissal of truth is serious: filmed almost like a documentary, Bohemian Rhapsody would likely deceive the non-Queen-experts among us into believing that the band had a dramatic, acrimonious split that simply did not occur.

Despite its mismanagement of Mercury’s sexuality and its occasional misinterpretations of history, Bohemian Rhapsody was a spectacular film that deserves its nomination for the Best Picture of 2018, though maybe not the award itself.

Categories: Arts

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