So Why Is There No School Wednesday?

BY: JACK MORGENSTEIN

If you’re anything like me, teacher workdays are to school like Morgan Freeman-narrated nature documentaries are to America. That is, everyone loves them and not a soul would mind just a few more. Before the school year starts, administrators from all parts of WCPSS convene like witches in covens of old, and one of the most important things on their dockets is the schedule for the upcoming year. Managing school days, holiday breaks, summer, and makeup time (along with a million other factors) is a delicate balancing act, during which WCPSS must please teachers, students, and principals alike. However, this Wednesday, October 9th, is no normal teacher workday; and for that matter, last Monday, September 30th, was no normal teacher workday either. These two “teacher workdays” are actually meant to recognize the two most important holidays in the Jewish faith: Rosh Hashanah, on September 30th, and Yom Kippur, on October 9th, exactly 10 days later. This might make you ask yourself, “Wait, there are Jews in Wake County?” The answer is that there are more than you might think, and I know this for certain… because I’m one of them.

For the last few years, we’ve had teacher workdays on these holidays as part of WCPSS’s effort to become more inclusive of Wake County’s rapidly changing population demographic. Something many take for granted is not having school on major Christian holidays; but for years, I’ve had to miss many days of school every semester, just because of my religion. Not falling behind on schoolwork every time is something I couldn’t be more thankful for, now that WCPSS is beginning to recognize the two holidays.

So, now you know why we have school off on a random Wednesday halfway through October, but what are Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur? The Jewish holiday most gentiles have probably heard of is Hanukkah, but in reality, Hanukkah is a minor holiday to religious Jews. Collectively, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are known as the “high holidays” a remark on their importance in Judaism. Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish new year. Yeah, that’s right: Jews all over the world celebrated the new year in September. Fortunately, it’s not just a case of mass delusion; Judaism actually runs on a separate lunar calendar from the 12-month Gregorian system we all know and love. In our calendar, we have 365 days a year, with a leap day every fourth year. The Jewish calendar is 353-355 days long in a normal year, with a whole leap month added seven years out of every nineteen. What this means is that Rosh Hashanah fell on September 10th last year, fell on September 30th this year, and will fall on September 19th next year. But in all three years, Rosh Hashanah fell on the Jewish Tishrei 1. It’s 2019 on the Gregorian calendar, but to Jews, it’s 5779. Crazy, right? 

             Rosh Hashanah itself is as straightforward a holiday as they come: I go to services in the morning and then have another service in the evening. The reason the new year is so important to Judaism has a lot to do with what it represents. Judaism is very big on forgiveness, and on Rosh Hashanah, you look back at your year and reflect on what mistakes you made. The evening service incorporates throwing breadcrumbs into a lake, symbolically casting off the sins of the previous year. But, just throwing some breadcrumbs into a lake isn’t enough to truly atone for a whole year’s worth of misdeeds. That’s where Yom Kippur comes in.

Yom Kippur is always exactly 10 days after Rosh Hashanah, a time period known as the Days of Awe. During these Days of Awe, Jews are supposed to continue reflecting on the previous year, specifically performing repentance, prayer, and charitable acts to close out the year on a good note. Requests for forgiveness are expected to be shared between family, friends, and neighbors. These sentiments build in the Jewish community until the day of Yom Kippur, translated as literally “day to atone.” From sundown the day beforehand to sundown on the day of, Jews are instructed to fast. Fasting is the practice of not eating or drinking for extended periods of time. By faithfully fasting, it is seen in many’s eyes as a request for forgiveness from god. At sundown on Yom Kippur, Jews break the fast with friends and family. This feast with those you care about most is meant to kick off the rest of the year on a positive note.

No matter what faith you follow, it’s always important to occasionally take a look at the diversity surrounding you. This Wednesday, when you’re sitting in your bed, procrastinating on that math homework you don’t want to do, take a moment and think about the Jews within your own community, who are fasting while doing the exact same thing.

Stop the RDU Quarry!

BY: JACK MORGENSTEIN

The melting of the polar ice caps. The burning of the Amazon rainforest. Thousands of species going extinct annually. If you’re anything like me, these issues produce visceral feelings of hopelessness, sorrow, and insignificance. As high school students in North Carolina, what CAN we do about global climate change? Using metal straws, reducing waste, or conserving power are all important actions, sure, but in the scheme of things, these actions mean very little. Research has shown that over 66% of man-made emissions are directly caused by companies rather than consumers. Recently, Wake County approved one of these companies to begin a massive new development over public lands, and this issue is something each of us can play a direct role in stopping. 

Graphic showing the effects of quarries on natural resources. (https://www.rduforest.com)

In March of this year, The RDU airport authority (a governmental organization) approved a lease allowing Wake Stone Corporation to develop a quarry on 105 acres of public land, as well as designate an additional 506 acres for commercial use. Currently, this heavily forested land is adjacent to William B. Umstead State Park and is home to an unknown multitude of plants and animals. Once the quarry is built, these thousands or even millions of living creatures will be either killed or displaced. Not only is this morally despicable, science shows us how harmful this could truly be. Each year, 611 acres of trees produce enough oxygen to sustain almost 11,000 people and remove almost 1,600 tons or 3,200,000 pounds of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Further, tree root systems are absolutely essential to maintaining water quality throughout our aquifers and watersheds (both of which directly feed into our water supply).

Map showing the location of the projected site for the new RDU Quarry. (https://www.rduforest.com)

Not only is this deal morally compromising and environmentally damning, a Wake County Court Judge ruled that it failed to follow federal regulations and NC state law regarding approval for how the deal plans to use the land. The main legal problem with the RDU quarry deal is that the land was previously designated for “aeronautical use” and before this land can be repurposed (such as for a quarry), the FAA needs to approve a “release” of the land as well as disseminate a Federal Register Notice. Despite the fact that neither of these steps were followed, Wake County Stone is continuing exploratory drilling in the area. 

Debra Laefer is an NYU professor of Civil and Urban Engineering. In 2003, she conducted research in Fountain, North Carolina near a quarry of similar size to the proposed RDU quarry. She found that a quarry near a residential area can cause millions in structural damage to houses over time. The RDU quarry would be significantly closer to houses than the Fountain, NC quarry ever was. The stated purpose of this quarry deal is to help fund a 4 billion dollar infrastructure plan. It’s worth noting that previous to the RDU quarry deal being signed, The Conservation Fund offered a 6.4 million dollar lump-sum payment for the land, which then would’ve become a part of an expanded Umstead park. This lump sum is not any less money than RDU may receive from the rock quarry if you factor in losses from property damage caused by the quarry. 

What all this means is that the deal for the RDU quarry is morally reprehensible as it will lead to unnecessary death and suffering of wildlife, environmentally detrimental towards air and water quality, legally flawed, and was chosen over a deal that is significantly better for our environment. However, hope is not lost, there are still many steps each of us can take in order to halt this repulsive agreement. 

What You Can Do:

  1. To learn more about the RDU quarry read here:
    https://www.rduforest.com/stoprduquarry
  2. Sign this Change.org petition: https://www.change.org/p/rdu-airport-authority-save-the-forested-lands-near-old-reedy-creek-within-rdu-s-project-area
  3. Email or call your elected officials, Wake County commissioners contacts can be found at http://www.wakegov.com/commissioners/districts/Pages/default.aspx
  4. Message our Governor Roy Cooper through https://governor.nc.gov/contact/contact-governor-cooper?fbclid=IwAR3p-ViOLD9XBZdTBnq6gXCuhHluAeqbrBsvPTMEYsW84P-uXiZh73Q9bHs
  5. Support this GoFundMe: https://www.gofundme.com/rdu-forest-save-the-trails
  6. Most importantly, spread the message about how our very own government plans to use public lands.

Thoughts From My Very First Pride

BY: BEC HOROWITZ

In the weeks leading up to September 28th, 2019, I spent hours curating the perfect rainbow outfit. My shirt— an oversized crop top from Target’s ‘Out and Proud’ line, my pants— burnt orange army pants with plenty of pockets to let my butch side shine, and my makeup— rainbow eyeliner practiced to blended glory ending in immaculate pointed wings. I was just a little excited about attending my first ever Pride event as an out queer teenager. My two best friends would be going with me and the Durham Pride Parade would be their first Pride excursion too, and they showed the same energy in preparing that I did. We texted each other about our Pride plans excitedly, counting down the mornings until we could be there— surrounded by people just like us. 


I’ll admit, half of the reason I wanted to go to pride was to see cute girls. The other half? To go one day without hearing “that’s gay” or “f*g” or d*ke” directed at one of my LGBT+ siblings. The only gay jokes heard that blissful morning were made by us, jokes about not being able to park straight, or walk straight, or basically do anything straight. The environment was endlessly positive. It seemed like everyone around us was smiling; like it was the happiest place on earth. 


So what was Pride like? Loud. And crowded. A little stressful as someone with social anxiety, but well worth it. We stood on the side of the street the Parade went down with hundreds of others, basking in the neon light of thousands of rainbow accessories caught in the morning sun. Clubs and organizations from Triangle cities and colleges (Duke, UNC, NC State, and ECU were all repped), RTP companies like Spectrum and Lenovo, and dozens of local churches of different denominations all came on floats, on foot, and truck beds. My personal favorites included the Durham Roller Derby League— a squad of young women weaving down the street on roller blades, decked out head to toe in Pride apparel— and the Latinx LGBTQI+ Initiative, or ‘Lila’— a float packed with butterfly decor and beautiful local drag queens rocking out to Lizzo. 

A colorful float shown at Durham Pride. (Bec Horowitz, October 2019)


After the Parade finished, we waded against the tide of parade-watchers over to the field of tents set up by local queer creators and larger organizations. I got to talk to representatives from the ACLU (and walked away with a dragon’s hoard of free laptop stickers) and Equality NC, the nation’s first state Equality chapter. 


Eventually, we had to head home. When we reached my friend’s car, I put my bag of free gay goodies in the trunk. The mini pride flag I had been given by a parader fell to the ground and, unnoticed in the lingering shouts and blaring music, got left behind. We finally drove away, silent in the afterglow of all that is Pride during the forty minute journey back to Cary. 


At my driveway, we said our goodbyes. One of my friends was already removing her rainbow ribbons; she had a family event to go to after, she explained. The other nodded and mentioned that she had to wipe off her makeup and change before going to her sisters dance performance. I realized I needed to change for Homecoming if I didn’t want to attract the wrong kind of attention while dancing with my friend-date. 


In my room, I cried while rubbing off my rainbow eyeshadow. I showered and washed my face while shaking, wondering why Pride had to be one day a year. Why I could only be myself one day a year? As I changed for Homecoming, I looked at all of my dresses, the garment my mom and probably everyone at school was expecting me to wear. I looked at my favorite army green romper…  and made my choice. Who says you can’t wear shorts to Homecoming? Before rushing out the door to meet my date, I spotted a small rainbow ribbon I had pinned to my Pride shirt. Who says you can’t wear a rainbow ribbon to Homecoming?


Today, on the first day of school after Pride (or A.P.), I saw “gay is not okay” scribbled on my desk. Smiling, and thinking back to Saturday night dancing with my friends without a care in the world, I crossed out “not” and added “gay is wonderful” below it. And with the shouts and drum beats of Pride still echoing in my heart, I felt what I wrote— truly— for the very first time. 

In the weeks leading up to September 28th, 2019, I spent hours curating the perfect rainbow outfit. My shirt— an oversized crop top from Target’s ‘Out and Proud’ line, my pants— burnt orange army pants with plenty of pockets to let my butch side shine, and my makeup— rainbow eyeliner practiced to blended glory ending in immaculate pointed wings. I was just a little excited about attending my first ever Pride event as an out queer teenager. My two best friends would be going with me and the Durham Pride Parade would be their first Pride excursion too, and they showed the same energy in preparing that I did. We texted each other about our Pride plans excitedly, counting down the mornings until we could be there— surrounded by people just like us. 


I’ll admit, half of the reason I wanted to go to pride was to see cute girls. The other half? To go one day without hearing “that’s gay” or “f*g” or d*ke” directed at one of my LGBT+ siblings. The only gay jokes heard that blissful morning were made by us, jokes about not being able to park straight, or walk straight, or basically do anything straight. The environment was endlessly positive. It seemed like everyone around us was smiling; like it was the happiest place on earth. 


So what was Pride like? Loud. And crowded. A little stressful as someone with social anxiety, but well worth it. We stood on the side of the street the Parade went down with hundreds of others, basking in the neon light of thousands of rainbow accessories caught in the morning sun. Clubs and organizations from Triangle cities and colleges (Duke, UNC, NC State, and ECU were all repped), RTP companies like Spectrum and Lenovo, and dozens of local churches of different denominations all came on floats, on foot, and truck beds. My personal favorites included the Durham Roller Derby League— a squad of young women weaving down the street on roller blades, decked out head to toe in Pride apparel— and the Latinx LGBTQI+ Initiative, or ‘Lila’— a float packed with butterfly decor and beautiful local drag queens rocking out to Lizzo. 


After the Parade finished, we waded against the tide of parade-watchers over to the field of tents set up by local queer creators and larger organizations. I got to talk to representatives from the ACLU (and walked away with a dragon’s hoard of free laptop stickers) and Equality NC, the nation’s first state Equality chapter. 


Eventually, we had to head home. When we reached my friend’s car, I put my bag of free gay goodies in the trunk. The mini pride flag I had been given by a parader fell to the ground and, unnoticed in the lingering shouts and blaring music, got left behind. We finally drove away, silent in the afterglow of all that is Pride during the forty minute journey back to Cary. 


At my driveway, we said our goodbyes. One of my friends was already removing her rainbow ribbons; she had a family event to go to after, she explained. The other nodded and mentioned that she had to wipe off her makeup and change before going to her sisters dance performance. I realized I needed to change for Homecoming if I didn’t want to attract the wrong kind of attention while dancing with my friend-date. 


In my room, I cried while rubbing off my rainbow eyeshadow. I showered and washed my face while shaking, wondering why Pride had to be one day a year. Why I could only be myself one day a year? As I changed for Homecoming, I looked at all of my dresses, the garment my mom and probably everyone at school was expecting me to wear. I looked at my favorite army green romper…  and made my choice. Who says you can’t wear shorts to Homecoming? Before rushing out the door to meet my date, I spotted a small rainbow ribbon I had pinned to my Pride shirt. Who says you can’t wear a rainbow ribbon to Homecoming?


Today, on the first day of school after Pride (or A.P.), I saw “gay is not okay” scribbled on my desk. Smiling, and thinking back to Saturday night dancing with my friends without a care in the world, I crossed out “not” and added “gay is wonderful” below it. And with the shouts and drum beats of Pride still echoing in my heart, I felt what I wrote— truly— for the very first time. 

What Exactly Does Impeachment Mean?

BY: ALEXIS COPE

“The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.” 

That’s Article II, Section IV of the Constitution of the United States, the document detailing the format and inner workings of our nation’s government. It’s well known, well studied, and well worn; it’s the ingenious piece of paper that has created the world’s first successful democracy. This Constitution has lasted over two hundred years, a small time compared to some nations, but a rather extraordinary amount of time for a democracy. Even after a civil war threatened to end that democracy, she persevered, and since then our nation has only grown stronger. Given recent developments, the Constitution’s impeachment policy has become of particular interest to the American public. 

So, what is impeachment, exactly? Well, it turns out it isn’t quite what you’re thinking.

First, some context. The first recorded use of impeachment was in the British Parliament, as a check of power on the king. It gave Parliament the ability to remove government officials without needing permission from the current ruling monarch. However, this process didn’t allow for the removal of the king, as he was considered the cornerstone of British power. 

It was in this detail that the Founding Fathers disagreed with Britain’s policy. They refuted the idea of a centralized power that could act without the consent of those it governed, especially since they had just gained independence from a nation whose government operated in that manner. 

Immediately after the Revolutionary War, the Founding Fathers set up America’s first government under The Articles of Confederation, a document that essentially let each state create its own government and function almost totally independently from the rest. However, the Articles failed after only a few years, chiefly due to the lack of a strong centralized government that could unite the states. At the Constitutional Convention in 1787, it was decided by the Founders and delegates from each state that centralized power was necessary to form a united nation and establish order.  With all agreeing that checks and balances were necessary to hinder abuses of power, the Founders set up systems such as the three branches of government, the need for Senate approval, veto power, and judicial review. If any official were to abuse his power or conspire against the nation, impeachment was set in place as a sort of final safety mechanism. 

So, how does impeachment work? 

According to the Constitution, the impeachment process starts when any citizen presents a serious claim of misconduct against any civil officer, including the president. Once an allegation is made, the case is taken to the House of Representatives, where the accusation and evidence will be reviewed and scoured by a House Committee – usually the Committee on Rules or the Committee on the Judiciary. After reviewing the evidence of misconduct, they will publish a recommendation. If there is cause to continue, the House will hold votes on the specific charges against the accused, also known as the Articles of Impeachment. If even one of the charges passes by a majority vote, the accused is impeached.

Impeachment itself does not remove an official from office, instead, it is simply the formal statement of misconduct. Removal is decided in a second step–trial–where the defendant can either be acquitted or convicted. The trial will take place before members of the Senate, who act as both the judge and the jury. It is worth noting that the Judicial Branch is only involved if the president or vice president is on trial. In this case, the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court presides over the meeting. In all cases, the accused official and their lawyers are given the opportunity to defend themselves. If, at the end of the trial, the vote to convict passes by a majority of two-thirds, the impeached official is immediately removed from their position, and their case is open for standard criminal prosecution. 

It’s a pretty straightforward process, but what crimes are worthy of impeachment? The Constitution isn’t very clear about this; an official can only be impeached for “treason, bribery, or other high crimes or misdemeanors.” So, really, there’s quite a lot of room for interpretation. 

Impeachment is a rare occurrence, let alone conviction and removal from office. In the entire history of the United States, only two presidents have been impeached: Andrew Johnson, for attempting to replace his Secretary of War without consent of the Senate, and Bill Clinton, for lying during a sexual harassment trial. Both were acquitted. Richard Nixon faced the possibility of impeachment but resigned before any true proceedings could occur.

 Within the past week, an impeachment inquiry against President Trump has been filed on the grounds of collusion with the ally nation of Ukraine. It all began when an unidentified whistleblower complained that the president had made an inappropriate “promise” to a foreign leader. We have since learned that President Trump, while on a call with Ukraine’s President Volodymyr Zelensky, urged Zelensky to “investigate” Joe Biden and his son, Hunter Biden. This call suspiciously fell a mere one week after President Trump ordered his acting Chief of Staff, Mick Mulvaney, to hold back nearly $400 million aid, slated to be used for military aid in Ukraine. House Democrats, led by the Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, immediately filed the inquiry. If the House finds sufficient evidence, President Trump may very well find himself added to that same short list of impeached presidents, and could possibly become the first to be removed from office. Only time will tell. 

On Thursday, President Trump began to publicly urge China to also investigate the Bidens.

BY JIM LO SCALZO/EPA/BLOOMBERG/GETTY IMAGES.
Nancy Pelosi formally endorsing an impeachment inquiry against President Trump.

A Cary Student’s Story: Lindy Gupton

BY: EBENEZER NKUNDA

There are 2400 students at Cary High. 2400 different stories of pain, happiness, success, failure, challenge, and overcoming obstacles. September is childhood cancer awareness month, and as it closes out, what better way to spread awareness than to share one of Cary High’s own stories of overcoming. Lindy Gupton is a senior here at Cary, well known for being a Gang Green Leader and Varsity Tennis Captain, as well as for all her spirit. Apart from this, there’s a side to her that most people don’t know. 

When Lindy was just one year old, she was diagnosed with Neuroblastoma. A particularly aggressive form of cancer, Neuroblastoma is most commonly formed in the nerve tissue on top of the kidneys, known as the adrenal glands. Being most prevalent in ages five or below, this illness is the third most common childhood cancer, one of the most deadly– only 67% of children diagnosed with Neuroblastoma live up to five years. 

Obviously, this was scary for Lindy and her family, but they didn’t give up. Lindy went through years of treatment, including chemotherapy, a bone marrow transplant, and five different types of surgeries. Neuroblastoma was not the only thing Lindy had to overcome; she fought through pneumonia, cellulitis, osteochondroma, and sepsis, all of which are extremely life-threatening. Nevertheless, she persevered. I can’t speak for those of you reading this, but I don’t know if even I, a 17-year-old, would be able to handle that. Lindy’s fight for her life as a two-year-old deserves nothing but RESPECT. 

Lindy spent years going in and out of hospitals and she was finally in remission at three years old. She now goes to the hospital once a year to see her oncologist, and she spends the rest of her time living life as she should—proud. She’s Lindy Gupton: Gang Green Member, Varsity Tennis Captain, Cancer Survivor.

Lindy Gupton 2019

Featured Picture shows Lindy Gupton (right) with her Mom and Sister in 2003

Cary’s Annual Homecoming Parade

BY: AMARAH DIN

Cary High School has many traditions, and one of the most fun to watch being the Homecoming Parade. The parade is a competition comprised of floats made by each grade’s student council, clubs, and even some football players who hop on a trailer, to celebrate the night of the homecoming football game.

Photographer: John Steadman

Last year’s theme was “fairytales”; unfortunately, Hurricane Florence pushed back the Homecoming Parade and ultimately resulted in its cancellation. This left many students unsatisfied with all the hard work put into their floats. To make up for this, the theme for this year’s parade was “movies” which would accommodate those who wanted to use their floats from last year.

Photographer: John Steadman

Photographer: John Steadman

So what did the parade look like? NJROTC led everyone through the streets, followed by the band, the Varsity Football team, and the nominees for Homecoming Queen. The floats: Club Unify chose the movie Despicable Me, Freshmen chose The Wizard of Oz, Sophomores chose Finding Nemo, Juniors chose Alice in Wonderland, and Seniors chose Grease. Each group had a challenge at their hands, but the outcome of each float was incredible. The Club Unify float featured the students dressed up as little yellow minions and a teacher with the infamous nose of Gru. The freshmen had many characters, like Dorothy, the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, and the Lion— oh my! The sophomore float was full of lively colors, including a giant coral structure, and bubbles floating all around. The juniors recreated the white queen’s massive castle and classic tea party. Lastly, the seniors built a bright red car with Danny and Sandy sitting it in and had multiple “greasers” zooming around on scooters. East and West Cary Middle School athletes came to walk with the high school students and their band was invited to play with Cary High’s band.

Club Unify’s Float Photographer: John Steadman

On Friday, September 27th, the parade began on Ralph Drive and ended on Jimmy Burns Way, and there were families, students, and teachers watching from all sides. Cheers and chants could be heard from every class and viewers throughout the entire journey.

Freshman Class Float Photographer: John Steadman

Sophomore Class Float Photographer: John Steadman

The winner of the parade was to be announced during half-time of Friday night’s homecoming football game. Club Unify’s Despicable Me float won “Best Club Float” and the junior class’ Alice in Wonderland float won first overall! The Juniors  were thrilled to win. Junior Student Council Treasurer, Vedika Tiwari, says, “It’s nice to know that the work we put into our float was worth it in the end. I’m super proud of how hard everybody worked on the float and how it turned out.” Even after all the stress of getting these floats together, everyone can agree that the 2019 Parade was an awesome experience for both the students and the audience. Until next year!

Junior Class Float Photographer: John Steadman

Senior Class Float Photographer: John Steadman

The Unique Impacts of Matthew, Florence, and Dorian

BY: ELISE BAGLEY

It’s well known that global climate change has led to an increased prevalence of extreme weather phenomena. North Carolina has been hit by several severe hurricanes in recent years, and those storms have not only impacted our state, but the country as a whole. Every hurricane is unique, with each having its own “personality.” For instance, every storm takes a different path to its final destination, due to deeply complicated, not-fully-understood weather patterns. Some hurricanes cause more flooding, while others lead to more wind damage; some hit the coast hard, while others may actually hit inland North Carolina worse. Since 2016, there have been three major hurricanes that have caused significant damage to our area. In order to better understand these storms, let’s look at some unique features of each. 

Hurricane Mathew: October 8-9, 2016

Hurricane Mathew was a unique storm for North Carolina: while most hurricanes enter North Carolina through the Outer Banks, Mathew came up into our state from South Carolina, before stalling and heading back out to sea. This caused catastrophic damage in the southeastern portion of the state, accumulating 4.8 billion dollars in damages. 28 people were killed in North Carolina alone, including 19 who drowned in their cars. 

Horrific flooding, caused by Hurricane Matthew, shown in a neighborhood in eastern North Carolina. (National Weather Service, 2016)

Hurricane Florence: September 14, 2018

Hurricane Florence, nicknamed “The Frankenstorm” made landfall just south of Wrightsville Beach on September 14, 2018. The Category 1 storm held sustained wind speeds of 106 miles per hour and a 12-foot storm surge. The Charlotte Observer stated that of the 33 hurricanes that hit North Carolina before Florence, the only other one that made landfall as far north as Florence was Hurricane Hazel (1933). Florence turned deadly due to its slow-moving and determined nature. 30 people died as a direct result of the storm and 23 additional people died in situations indirectly related to Hurricane Florence. The cost for damages far exceeded Mathew, at 17 billion dollars in statewide damages. 

Neighbors shown attempting to rescue local citizens from the rising floodwaters of Hurricane Florence. (Chip Somodevilla-Getty Images, 2018)

Hurricane Dorian: August 22-24, 2019

In late August of this year, Hurricane Dorian devastated the Bahamas and made its way to the States. Dorian’s path traveled straight up the east coast of the US, making landfall in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina. Dorian reached the Outer Banks as a powerful Category 2 storm, devastating these islands with the second direct hit from a hurricane in less than a year. Even houses on stilts had water covering their first floors as Dorian raised water levels over 7 feet in just an hour and a half. Dorian spun off many tornadoes with wind speeds of up to 90 miles an hour. Hundreds of residents were trapped on top of their houses waiting to be rescued. Four people have died in North Carolina due to Dorian and the cost for damages is estimated to be over 5 billion dollars nationwide. 

A trailer home in Emerald Isle in shown upended after a tornado caused by Hurricane Dorian.  (Morgan Newell-NewsChannel 12, 2019)

Header image: Satellite view of Hurricane Dorian on September 2 GETTY IMAGES