Movie Review: A Star is Born

BY JONAH LAWSON

Overall Rating: ★★★★★

Warning: Minor spoilers… obviously

A Star is Born is a romantic film centered around an aging rock star (Jackson Maine played by Bradley Cooper) and a struggling musician (Ally played by Lady Gaga) he takes under his wing and falls in love with. The fourth film of its name and general plot arc (the previous three were released in 1937, 1954, and 1976), this directorial debut from Bradley Cooper has been nominated in eight categories, including Best Picture, at Sunday’s Academy Awards.

It had the feel of La La Land, which swept the Oscars two years ago (though famously not Best Picture). It featured many characteristics of classic Hollywood love stories — a euphoric beginning and emotionally devastating ending — only it went much further. The film’s darker and more mature approach, complete with drug abuse, difficult childhoods, and commentary on the public’s destructive obsession with stars, makes the film more intensely emotional than other romantic flicks. Jackson Maine’s downward spiral begins with his struggles with addiction, then improves with the help of a loved one, only to spiral further downward until he crashes — something many have witnessed in a world where addiction runs rampant. Ally’s storyline was equally riveting; we see her leave behind the pride she holds so dearly, as fame and money loosen her morals and convince her to abandon herself. The film addresses other important issues, such as Hollywood’s reluctance to allow people outside typical standards of beauty to reach fame; Ally reveals that many producers had rejected her talented voice when they saw her large nose. Another would be the film’s inclusion of a drag bar, which is rarely featured in blockbuster movies. Although the short scene may seem insignificant to some, it portrays drag in a positive, healthy light instead of including it as an oddity. Finally, I would like to address this movie’s spectacular playlist, featuring amazing originals such as “Always Remember Us This Way,” “I’ll Never Love Again,” and “Shallow,” which was nominated for Best Original Song. Even if you decide not to watch the movie, these songs can be played on repeat without getting old, and I highly recommend listening to them.

One criticism of the film is its transitions, which were occasionally confusing and hard to follow. For example, I still have no clue what led Maine to his final scene, which may have dampened its emotional impact. But in all honesty, this issue was minor, and the movie is one of the best romantic films out there. I highly recommend A Star is Born for its emotional storyline and the broad span of issues it addresses.