The 2019 Green Tie Gala: Celebrating the Fine Arts at CHS

BY JAKE BRYANT

The week before Spring Break is usually one of the toughest; at this point in the year, months from the last full-length break, many students are barely clinging on to their academic motivation. Luckily, at Cary High this week still goes out with a bang; enter The Green Tie Gala, a vivacious celebration of all of the fine-arts happenings at Cary. Not only does this occasion bring students together from all over the school, it is also a vibrant beacon of art and culture in the larger community of Cary.

The Gala began in 2007 as a fundraiser for the newly-built 3000 building. Now part of a twelve-year-strong tradition, it is still the chief fundraiser for CHS Performing Arts Booster Club. However, that’s not all it is; the Gala is also a showcase of the immense talent and overwhelming creativity Cary’s students have to offer.

The 2019 Green Tie Gala offered a form of entertainment for everyone. Even before the show, eye-popping pieces of art from the CHS Visual Arts Department were on display, and the Culinary Academy provided delectable appetizers. The show kicked off with a performance from the Concert Chorus, followed by a performance from the Beginning Band. Then, several of Cary High’s smaller, yet just as illustrious, ensembles took the stage, including the CHS Percussion Ensemble, Jazz Band, Green Eggs & Jam, and CHS Improv. The night also featured several selections from the CHS Symphonic Band, as well as a medley of solo performances from Cary High’s astonishing (no bias here) spring musical, Little Women.

However, the most jaw-dropping performance of the night was the show’s finale, in which the Cary High Band, Orchestra, and Chorus shared the stage and performed three masterworks together. This year’s finale included Verdi’s triumphant “Anvil Chorus,” John Williams’ soaring “Hymn to the Fallen” from the film Saving Private Ryan, and the epic-yet-harrowing Duel of the Fates from Star Wars: Episode I—The Phantom Menace. This breathtaking blend of beauty, power, and drama was sure to delight, move, and dazzle every audience member.

The 2019 Green Tie Gala was a huge success, and if you missed out on watching it, make sure to come next year. In the meantime, check out the Cary High Performing Arts page to catch the year’s remaining arts performances and showcases from Cary High’s finest.

Movie Review: A Star is Born

BY JONAH LAWSON

Overall Rating: ★★★★★

Warning: Minor spoilers… obviously

A Star is Born is a romantic film centered around an aging rock star (Jackson Maine played by Bradley Cooper) and a struggling musician (Ally played by Lady Gaga) he takes under his wing and falls in love with. The fourth film of its name and general plot arc (the previous three were released in 1937, 1954, and 1976), this directorial debut from Bradley Cooper has been nominated in eight categories, including Best Picture, at Sunday’s Academy Awards.

It had the feel of La La Land, which swept the Oscars two years ago (though famously not Best Picture). It featured many characteristics of classic Hollywood love stories — a euphoric beginning and emotionally devastating ending — only it went much further. The film’s darker and more mature approach, complete with drug abuse, difficult childhoods, and commentary on the public’s destructive obsession with stars, makes the film more intensely emotional than other romantic flicks. Jackson Maine’s downward spiral begins with his struggles with addiction, then improves with the help of a loved one, only to spiral further downward until he crashes — something many have witnessed in a world where addiction runs rampant. Ally’s storyline was equally riveting; we see her leave behind the pride she holds so dearly, as fame and money loosen her morals and convince her to abandon herself. The film addresses other important issues, such as Hollywood’s reluctance to allow people outside typical standards of beauty to reach fame; Ally reveals that many producers had rejected her talented voice when they saw her large nose. Another would be the film’s inclusion of a drag bar, which is rarely featured in blockbuster movies. Although the short scene may seem insignificant to some, it portrays drag in a positive, healthy light instead of including it as an oddity. Finally, I would like to address this movie’s spectacular playlist, featuring amazing originals such as “Always Remember Us This Way,” “I’ll Never Love Again,” and “Shallow,” which was nominated for Best Original Song. Even if you decide not to watch the movie, these songs can be played on repeat without getting old, and I highly recommend listening to them.

One criticism of the film is its transitions, which were occasionally confusing and hard to follow. For example, I still have no clue what led Maine to his final scene, which may have dampened its emotional impact. But in all honesty, this issue was minor, and the movie is one of the best romantic films out there. I highly recommend A Star is Born for its emotional storyline and the broad span of issues it addresses.

Movie Review: Bohemian Rhapsody

BY JONAH LAWSON

Overall Rating: ★★★☆☆

Warning: Minor spoilers… obviously

Nominated in six categories, including Best Picture, at Sunday’s Academy Awards, Bohemian Rhapsody is a biopic based on the life of Freddie Mercury, the late lead singer of best-selling rock band Queen. The song “Bohemian Rhapsody” received harsh reviews from critics but was adored by fans, and the same can be said for the movie (and consider me a fan).

Nearly everyone can agree on Rami Malek’s fantastic performance as Freddie Mercury, which blended flamboyant moments on stage with heart-rending scenes from Mercury’s personal life. While I wouldn’t necessarily say this movie should win Best Picture, Malek’s rendition of a unique, famously private man is a major contender for Best Actor, and deservedly so. Another positive for the film was its inclusion of Freddie Mercury’s sexuality. The film devoted many scenes to his struggles with coming out and his drug usage, a problem faced by the LGBTQ  community during this period as they struggled with discrimination and abuse. Some critics hold that the film doesn’t cover his sexuality in enough depth, but in the end the film wasn’t intended to focus solely on his sexuality, and it focused on it sufficiently. To be honest, when I saw the trailer, I and many others believed they wouldn’t mention his sexuality at all.

Bohemian Rhapsody has been called the highest grossing LGBTQ film in history, and with that title comes certain responsibilities, which brings me to my major issue with the film: it assumes that Freddie Mercury is gay when he may have been bisexual. He never confirmed his sexuality, but he did maintain long-term relationships with both men and women. This bisexual erasure is very harmful, especially coming from an LGBTQ film, because it perpetuates the stereotype that bisexuals are simply confused and that people can only be either gay or straight. Another issue the film faces is its moments of historical inaccuracy, particularly in the scenes immediately preceding the Live Aid concert. In reality, the band had not broken up at this point, and while Mercury had gone solo, it was not due to animosity within the band (as the movie depicts); in fact, during his solo career Mercury stayed in touch with his bandmates. The film also features Mercury revealing his AIDS diagnosis to his band before the Live Aid concert. This unnecessarily dramatic monologue technically shouldn’t occur until two years after the Live Aid performance. In these two instances, the film decides to discard truth in favor of dramatization, and this dismissal of truth is serious: filmed almost like a documentary, Bohemian Rhapsody would likely deceive the non-Queen-experts among us into believing that the band had a dramatic, acrimonious split that simply did not occur.

Despite its mismanagement of Mercury’s sexuality and its occasional misinterpretations of history, Bohemian Rhapsody was a spectacular film that deserves its nomination for the Best Picture of 2018, though maybe not the award itself.

Movie Review: Beautiful Boy

BY JONAH LAWSON

Rating: ★★★★☆

Warning: Minor spoilers… obviously

Beautiful Boy, based on the memoirs Tweak and Beautiful Boy by Nic and David Sheff respectively, follows a teenage boy (Nic) through his addiction to crystal meth and a father (David) through his struggle to help his son. Depicting relapse after relapse, this coming of age story brings attention to the drug epidemic currently plaguing young Americans, while also humanizing the victims.

What made this film were its outstanding cast, character development, and supporting roles. The up-and-coming Timothée Chalamet delivers an amazing portrayal of Nic, alternating between moments of convincing readiness to change and devastating hopelessness. Meanwhile, Steve Carell plays David deftly, eliminating nearly all remnants of his former comedic persona as he further solidifies his transition to a more “serious” actor. Thankfully, the centerpiece of the film—Nic’s character development—is also very strong. Nic has moments of stable happiness followed by rapid decline, each phase more and more intense as the film progresses. At one point Nic appears incredibly content with his life and the end of the movie feels near, but before you know it, his addiction takes hold once again. Karen, Nic’s step-mom, also has a very intriguing character arc as she attempts to balance the safety of her children with her love for Nic. Finally, a shout-out to Jasper, Nic’s young half brother: he manages to steal all the attention whenever he’s on camera, and his simultaneous idolization of and disappointment with Nic featured in a scene that almost made me cry.

My complaints with the film center around its constant attempts to lighten the mood, ostensibly to make it more palatable. First off, Nic’s parents are Michael and Holly from The Office. My sister asked me if Beautiful Boy was showing the aftermath of season nine. Word of advice: if you make a movie about a serious issue, such as the drug epidemic, and someone is able to ask you this question, you’ve done something horribly wrong. Second, while watching Beautiful Boy, if a scene features Nic using drugs or writhing on the bathroom floor, expect an image of a little boy having fun with his dad to follow. I understand wanting the audience to remember what Nic used to be like, and if used in moderation this method would be a great benefit to the film. The issue is that Beautiful Boy is supposed to have a darker side to it, and it’s impossible for that side of the film to fully develop if it’s bombarded by a laughing child every five minutes. Lastly, many important, more troubling aspects of Nic’s addiction are ignored in the film, namely Nic’s sex work. A sex worker is shown, but it’s very brief and the consequences of that life aren’t explored. This is such an important topic to mention because sex work is often one of the worst consequences of addiction, as people relying on drugs frequently can’t find work. As The Advocate beautifully puts it, “as much as Beautiful Boy holds itself out as a bold and uncensored declaration about substance abuse and the toll it takes, it is also an obfuscation.”

Overall, Beautiful Boy is a film I would recommend as, despite its censorship issues, it features an amazing cast and dives into the important issue of drug addiction among students.